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Clayton Farm and Community Market

348 E. Main St., Clayton, NC

Welcome to the newest addition to our site.  

 Chef Carver's Kitchen 

Chef Carver is the Culinary Instructor at the Johnston County Junior Collage,

a respected and long standing CFCM board member

and a really good cook!

Check out his strawberry recipes on the home page. Those recipes will be changing with the availability of the seasonal vegetables.  Plus, he will be sharing some of his culinary hints. 

If you have any questions about food, preparation, planning or suggestions, he's here to help.  Send your questions to the box on the contact page. Remember - you can feel free to share us with your family and friends.  Let us know what you think, and give us your suggestions.

In the mean time, check out the recipes below, and tune into the videos.  They are full of great information and are prepared for you by the United States Department of Agriculture.

So welcome and stop by frequently. 

Bon apetite,and dig in!

 

 

 The Humble Strawberry

Health & Nutrition Information

The Romans prized wild strawberries for their medicinal properties. Ounce for ounce, strawberries have more Vitamin C than citrus fruit. According to the American Cancer Society, foods rich in Vitamin C may lower the risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 1 cup sliced fresh strawberries (166 grams)

Calories 50
Protein 1 gram
Carbohydrates 11.65 grams
Dietary Fiber 3.81 grams
Calcium 23.24 mg
Iron 0.63 mg
Magnesium 16.60 mg
Phosphorus 31.54 mg
Potassium 44.82 mg
Selenium 1.16 mg
Vitamin C 94.12 mg
Folate 29.38 mcg
Vitamin A 44..82 IU

When Measuring Strawberries

1 1/2 pounds = 2 pints or 1 quart
1 small basket = 1 pint
1 pint = 3 1/4 cups whole berries
1 pint = 2 1/4 cups sliced berries
1 pint = 1 2/3 cup pureed berries
1 cup = about 4 ounces

History & Lore

  • "Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did." (Dr. William Butler, 17th Century English Writer) Dr. Butler is referring to the strawberry. Strawberries are the best of the berries. The delicate heart-shaped berry has always connoted purity, passion and healing. It has been used in stories, literature and paintings through the ages.

  • In Othello, Shakespeare decorated Desdemonda's handkerchief with symbolic strawberries.

  • Madame Tallien, a prominent figure at the court of the Emperor Napoleon, was famous for bathing in the juice of fresh strawberries. She used 22 pounds per basin, needless to say, she did not bathe daily.

  • In parts of Bavaria, country folk still practice the annual rite each spring of tying small baskets of wild strawberries to the horns of their cattle as an offering to elves. They believe that the elves, who are passionately fond of strawberries, will help to produce healthy calves and abundance of milk in return.

  • The American Indians were already eating strawberries when the Colonists arrived. The crushed berries were mixed with cornmeal and baked into strawberry bread. After trying this bread, Colonists developed their own version of the recipe and Strawberry Shortcake was created.

  • In Greek and Roman times, the strawberry was a wild plant.

  • The English "strawberry" comes from the Anglo-Saxon "streoberie" not spelled in the modern fashion until 1538.

  • The first documented botanical illustration of a strawberry plant appeared as a figure in Herbaries in 1454.

  • In 1780, the first strawberry hybrid "Hudson" was developed in the United States.

  • Legend has it that if you break a double strawberry in half and share it with a member of the opposite sex, you will fall in love with each other.

  • The strawberry was a symbol for Venus, the Goddess of Love, because of its heart shapes and red color.

  • Queen Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII had a strawberry shaped birthmark on her neck, which some claimed proved she was a witch.

  • To symbolize perfection and righteousness, medieval stone masons carved strawberry designs on altars and around the tops of pillars in churches and cathedrals.

  • The wide distribution of wild strawberries is largely from seeds sown by birds. It seems that when birds eat the wild berries the seeds pass through them intact and in reasonably good condition. The germinating seeds respond to light rather than moisture and therefore need no covering of earth to start growing.

Medicinal Uses

  • The strawberry, a member of the rose family, is unique in that it is the only fruit with seeds on the outside rather than the inside. Many medicinal uses were claimed for the wild strawberry, its leaves and root.

  • The ancient Romans believed that the berries alleviated symptoms of melancholy, fainting, all inflammations, fevers, throat infections, kidney stones, halitosis, attacks of gout, and diseases of the blood, liver and spleen.

ENJOY!

Gerry Morgan

Board Secretary

Healthy Strawberry Oat Bars (Gluten Free)

 

yield: 16 BARS
 
prep time:20 MINS
cook time:35 MINS
The easiest, best strawberry oatmeal bars with butter crumb topping. One bowl, simple ingredients, and 100% whole grain—perfect for a snack or dessert!

INGREDIENTS FOR THE STRAWBERRY BARS:

  • 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats — gluten free if needed
  • 3/4 cup white whole wheat flour — or substitute all-purpose flour or 1:1 baking flour to make gluten free
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter — melted (or substitute melted coconut oil to make vegan/dairy free)
  • 2 cups small-diced strawberries — about 10 ounces, divided
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon  freshly squeezed lemon juice — from about 1/2 small lemon
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar — divided

FOR THE VANILLA GLAZE (OPTIONAL BUT DELICIOUS, ESPECIALLY IF YOU PREFER A SWEETER BAR):

  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar — sifted
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon milk — any kind you like

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Place a rack in the center of your oven and preheat to 375 degrees F. Line an 8x8-inch baking pan with parchment paper so that the paper overhangs two sides like handles.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the oats, flour, brown sugar, ginger, and salt. Pour in the melted butter and stir until it forms clumps and the dry ingredients are evenly moistened. Set aside 1/2 cup of the crumble mixture, then press the rest into an even layer in the bottom of the prepared pan.
  3. Scatter half of the strawberries over the crust. Sprinkle the cornstarch evenly over the top, then sprinkle on the lemon juice and 1/2 tablespoon of the granulated sugar. Scatter on the remaining berries, then the remaining 1/2 tablespoon sugar. Sprinkle the reserved crumbs evenly over the top. You will have some fruit showing through.
  4. Bake the bars for 35 to 40 minutes, until the fruit is bubbly and the crumb topping smells toasty and looks golden. Place the pan on a wire rack to cool completely (you can speed this process along in the refrigerator).
  5. While the bars cool, prepare the glaze: In a medium bowl, briskly whisk together the powdered sugar, vanilla, and milk until smooth. Feel free to add more milk if a thinner consistency is desired. Using the parchment-paper handles, lift the bars from the pan. Drizzle with glaze, slice, and serve.

RECIPE NOTES

  • The recipe can be doubled and baked in a 9x13-inch baking pan. The bars will be a bit thicker but will still be delicious. To make them gluten free, substitute the white whole wheat flour with a 1:1 baking mix.
  • Store leftovers in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
  • To freeze, let the bars cool completely and do not glaze. Wrap tightly in plastic before placing in the freezer. Let thaw in the refrigerator and top with glaze before serving. (Bars can be frozen already glazed if needed.)

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Amount per serving (1 (of 16) without glaze) — Calories: 100, Fat: 5g, Saturated Fat: 3g, Cholesterol: 44mg, Sodium: 19mg, Carbohydrates: 13g, Fiber: 2g, Sugar: 3g, Protein: 2g